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The 4 Best Cities to View the Solar Eclipse From

With the upcoming solar eclipse fixing to be one of the most epic natural phenomena of 2017, it's understandable that millions of Americans are preparing to watch. While of course it's important to keep solar eclipse safety in mind first and foremost, many folks might be wondering where to watch the solar eclipse when it takes place on August 21. Good news — we have your answer!

As you might know already, the solar eclipse will cross over the entirety of the continental United States, beginning in Oregon and ending in South Carolina. But though the path passes through many states, there's no question viewing will be much better in some areas than others.

According to research at the University of Idaho, favorable viewing conditions for the solar eclipse are much more likely in the western United States. Unfortunately for those who are living further east, the viewing conditions are likely to decline.

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NASA explained that Oregon, Idaho, and Wyoming will have the best chance of clear skies, whereas the eastern part of the country is likelier to see clouds. (What a bummer!)

But where should you go for the best chance of seeing a great view of the eclipse? The best shots in big cities include Salem, Oregon; Idaho Falls, Idaho' Casper, Wyoming; and Lincoln, Nebraska.

Take a look at the complete forecast for yourself below and see how your view will likely fare.

Of course, it's always important to regularly check in with weather updates as they come, because there's always the possibility that things could change. But in the meantime, keep your fingers crossed for clear skies all across the board, because we'd hate for anyone to miss out on this due to pesky clouds!

h/t TravelandLeisure.com

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