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Has the TSA Confiscated Something of Yours? You Might Be Able to Get It Back

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If you've ever been to an airport, chances are, you've wondered what happened to those TSA confiscated goods. And if you've ever gone through security yourself and had something of yours taken away by the agents, chances are, you've definitely wondered where your stuff has ended up.

You might know already that if TSA confiscates any of your liquids (e.g. your makeup remover or body wash), it ends up straight in the trash can. But if it's not a liquid product, that's where things get a lot more interesting. You see, there may be a way a way for you to recover your dearly departed goods — but it'll cost you.

As it turns out, there's a website called GovDeals.com that many state agencies use to sell confiscated and surplus goods. Reminiscent of eBay, the website actually allows its users to bid on items that these agencies are trying to get out of their hands.

That means that the precious bottle opener you might have mistakenly thrown into your carry-on could be selling for the highest bidder right as we speak. Or, if it was really precious, someone may have snatched it up already (sorry!).

In case you're wondering, the TSA is not making loads of cash off of your confiscated goods. Instead, they use a contractor to clear the goods out of the airports. Then, states can purchase the items and sell them on the internet to make a profit.

So what happens if your goods don't make the cut, or if someone else cuts you to the chase in getting to your items first? The good news is that although you may not be able to ever get your original item back (so long, nail clippers!), you can find a lot of interesting replacement items on the site. And if you get really lucky, who knows? You might even get something better than your original.

Now that's the kind of "finder's keepers" we can get behind!

h/t Travel and Leisure

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