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Southerners Can Look Forward to a Warmer-Than-Usual Spring

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Considering how brutal this winter has been for most of the country, it's no surprise that many folks are excited about spring weather. A few experiences with polar vortexes and bomb cyclones will have anyone daydreaming about sunshine and blooming flowers in no time. Well, if you live in the South, we have some good news: You might not need to wait much longer for your long-awaited spring.

While people who live in the Midwest, Northeast, and West will probably need to hang on tightly to their puffy coats and cozy scarves for most of March, Southerners will be able to bask in the warmth in that same month. And when we say "warm," we mean really warm. Southern and Southwestern states can expect a warmer-than-usual springtime this year, according to new info from the United States Climate Prediction Center.

Southern Louisiana, parts of Texas, and central and southern Florida are the regions most likely to see the warmest temps during the first month of the spring season. While this is great news for anyone who lives in or nearby those areas, it's definitely a bit of a bummer for the rest of us who live a little further up north.

Meteorologists are predicting that winter will linger in many parts of the country where people are probably missing those good ol' spring flowers more than ever — especially folks who live in the northern Plains and upper Midwest, where the temps are expected to be the farthest below average.

The good news is that this is the perfect excuse to plan a little getaway to one of the warmer states if you feel like you need a break from the cold. (We know we sure do!) But in the meantime, let's all just hope the South will share the warmth with the rest of us soon.

Next, learn the best spring cleaning jobs that will freshen up your home long before it's warm outside in the video below:

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