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Sheer Blinds Recalled Due to Strangulation Hazard

CPSC

This is terrifying: Window blinds are being recalled due to a strangulation hazard. The recall affects sheer blinds from Hunter Douglas and other branded and generic sheer blinds, according to the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC).

The risk with these blinds involves the cord restraints on the combination wand/cord, which can break and pose a strangulation risk, especially for children. So far, there have been 11 reports of broken or cracked cord restraints. Fortunately, no injuries have been reported. It would be wonderful if we could all do our part to keep it this way!

The 550 blinds in question were sold nationwide from January through March 2017 at stores like Budget Blinds, Hunter Douglas dealers, JC Penney, and Lowes. They include custom-made Luminette privacy sheer blinds, as well as other branded and generic sheer blinds listed below, with the combination wand/cord sold in white:

Allen + Roth Vertical Sheers

Alta Shadings

Budget Blinds Enlightened Style Shadings

Comfortex Vertical Sheer Shadings

Luxaflex

MyBlinds Shadings

Smith & Noble

Vertical Sheer Shadings by Turnils, Unique Wholesale, United Supply, Century, Oxford House, or Matisse

Vista Shadings

Consumers who purchased the recalled blinds are urged to immediately stop using them and contact Hunter Douglas for a free repair kit. Though Hunter Douglas is contacting all known purchasers directly, you can also reach out to the company yourself by calling 800-997-2389 from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. ET Monday through Friday or visiting the official website at www.hunterdouglas.com and clicking on Child Safety at the bottom of the page.

Even if you didn't purchase these blinds yourself, it's worth spreading the word to anyone you know who may have bought them. Let's do our part to keep our loved ones safe — especially the little ones!

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