Health

Why Are My Baby Carrots Turning White?

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If you notice your baby carrots turning white, it’s understandable to feel a bit concerned. Even if you’ve been properly storing them in the fridge since buying them, you might wonder if your healthy snack is still safe to eat. So, what’s the deal? What does it really mean when baby carrots start to show that mysterious white coating?

According to the Water Quality and Health Council, there has been a myth floating around for years that the white film on baby carrots is chlorine residue from carrot processing. Some even think that this so-called “chlorine” is a cancer risk to people. Turns out, this rumor is just that: a rumor. As the Water Quality and Health Council reports, this white film is simply a thin layer of dehydrated carrot. This “carrot blush” happens when baby carrots are exposed to the atmosphere and the outer layer of the carrots become dry.

As you may have noticed, this phenomenon is far more likely to happen to baby carrots than larger carrots. That’s because most baby carrots are created to look the way they do in a process of cutting and shaping. So unlike full-size carrots, baby carrots don’t have the same extra layer to protect them from drying out.

But wait, what about the chlorine? Are baby carrots really washed in that? Yes, but here’s why you don’t need to worry: Experts say the chlorine water mixture actually helps prevent food-borne illness from harmful germs in this case. Without the chlorine water wash, you’re actually more at risk of getting sick from eating baby carrots. Who wants that?

So the next time you’re in the mood for munching on baby carrots, you can enjoy them regardless of whether they have a white film on top of them or not. (Just be sure that they haven’t passed the expiration date, of course.) Furthermore, you can feel confident sharing them with your loved ones if they’re craving something healthy. 

Happy snacking!

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