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10 Wacky Facts About the 1980’s John Hughes Movie ‘Weird Science’ 

Find out which other John Hughes movies were referenced! 

Conjuring up your dream girlfriend in a computer might seem just a wee bit bizarre, made even more so when you find yourself capable of bringing her into the real world — which is exactly what happens in the 1985 film, Weird Science.

Written and directed by John Hughes, its cast includes Anthony Michael Hall — then geek-deep in his adventures with the Brat Pack — Ilan Mitchell-Smith (moving on a couple of years later to play Andy McCalister in the Superboy television series) and Kelly LeBrock.

To celebrate the film turning 29 (why hold off on the fun until its 30th anniversary?), we’ve rounded up the 10 wackiest facts about Weird Science, including where the idea for the film came from.

You can stream Weird Science on Hulu!

1. The film had a connection to The Breakfast Club

Anthony Michael Hall and Ilan Mitchell-Smith (1985)
Anthony Michael Hall and Ilan Mitchell-Smith in ‘Weird Science’ (1985) moviestillsdb.com/Universal Pictures

Not only were both films 1980’s hit teen movies, but they took place at the same high school! That’s right, Shermer High School was the the bastion of education in both Weird Science and The Breakfast Club. The connection was never brought up though.

Both films also star Anthony Michael Hall, and John Kapelos (Dino), who played Carl the janitor in each of them.

2. John Hughes wasn’t very happy while filming

John Hughes on the set of 'Weird Science' (1985)
John Hughes on the set of ‘Weird Science’ (1985) moviestillsdb.com/Universal Pictures

Director and writer John Hughes wasn’t very pleased with the filming schedule of Weird Science, because it interfered with his work on The Breakfast Club (1985) — which he was more passionate about. But after Universal Pictures told Hughes that he could finish work on The Breakfast Club after filming for Weird Science was completed, the director’s view mellowed.

3. Weird Science also had a connection to Sixteen Candles

Kelly LeBrock and Anthony Michael Hall (1985)
Kelly LeBrock and Anthony Michael Hall in ‘Weird Science’ (1985) moviestillsdb.com/Universal Pictures

Fans of John Hughes’ movies might have realized that the exterior of the high school in Weird Science, was the same one used in Sixteen Candles. If you study it closely, you can see that the same people are making the same movements, in both films (in other words, it’s the same footage).

4. Anthony Michael Hall chose Weird Science over another film

Anthony Michael Hall in 'Weird Science' (1985)
Anthony Michael Hall in ‘Weird Science’ (1985) moviestillsdb.com/Universal Pictures

Before filming for Weird Science started, Hall was supposed to star as Russ Griswold in National Lampoon’s European Vacation (1985) — since he played him in the 1983’s original Vacation — but he declined so he could play Gary Wallace instead.

5. John Hughes wrote the script super fast

Anthony Michael Hall and Ilan Mitchell-Smith
Anthony Michael Hall and Ilan Mitchell-Smith in ‘Weird Science’ (1985) moviestillsdb.com/Universal Pictures

John Hughes wrote the script in just two days, and showed it to Anthony Michael hall while they were working on The Breakfast Club in the hopes that he would agree to star in it.

“He [Hughes] was truly prolific. I mean, to go home and write the first act of another screenplay [when] you’re shooting The Breakfast Club? He was amazing,” Hall exclaimed.

6. Kelly LeBrock’s favorite scene was a weird one

Kelly LeBrock in 'Weird Science' (1985)
Kelly LeBrock in ‘Weird Science’ (1985) moviestillsdb.com/Universal Pictures

This hilarious science (kind of) film featured a variety of memorable moments, though LeBrock has one specific favorite. “When I pull a gun on the parents. It’s just so naughty and outrageous and ridiculous, but it seemed to work for that moment,” LeBrock explained.

That scene almost looked very different, though, because LeBrock initially said no to starring as Lisa in the film since she was vacationing in France at the time and didn’t want to come back to America. Needless to say, she did.

7. Gary from Weird Science and Brian from The Breakfast Club had something in common

Anthony Michael Hall in 'Weird Science' (1985)
Anthony Michael Hall in ‘Weird Science’ (1985) moviestillsdb.com/Universal Pictures

Aside from the fact that both Gary and Brian were played by Anthony Michael Hall, both boys claimed to have a girlfriend in Canada. Fans of two films, of course, know that in the two instances, their “girlfriends” were imaginary.

8. Weird Science had John Hughes’ signature move

Bill Paxton and Ian Mitchell-Smith (1985)
Bill Paxton and Ian Mitchell-Smith in ‘Weird Science’ (1985) moviestillsdb.com/Universal Pictures

One of John Hughes’ signatures as a director is having his actors look directly at the camera, therefore breaking the fourth wall.

In Weird Science, this happens right after Chet (Bill Paxton) yells at Wyatt, “Wearing women’s underpants? Next thing you know, you’ll be wearing a bra on your head. Instead of responding, Wyatt just looks directly at the camera, fourth wall broken!

9. The film was inspired by a series of comic books

Anthony Michael Hall and Ilan Mitchell-Smith
Anthony Michael Hall and Ilan Mitchell-Smith in ‘Weird Science’ (1985) moviestillsdb.com/Universal Pictures

Although John Hughes wrote the film, the idea for it came from the comic Made of the Future. by Al Feldstein. The film’s name was also taken from a 1950’s comic book series written by William M. Gaines.

10. The name of Kelly LeBrock’s character name was chosen for a reason

Kelly LeBrock in 'Weird Science' (1985)
Kelly LeBrock in ‘Weird Science’ (1985) moviestillsdb.com/Universal Pictures

Keeping in tune with the technology theme of the film, Lisa’s (LeBrock) name was chosen in honor of Apple Computer’s first GUI computer, the Apple Lisa (Locally Integrated Software Architecture)

The Apple Lisa first hit the market in January 1983, but was discontinued in August 1986. Kelly LeBrock’s Lisa has lived on in our imaginations ever since.


For all of our 1980’s coverage, click here!

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